Cambrian News

Cambrian News

4 February 1871

TREFEGLWYS.

SCHOLARSHIP. — Mr Thomas Humphreys, formerly one of the monitors in the British School, was successful at the Queen’s Scholarship axamination held at Bangor Normal College, last Christmas.

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29 December 1871

DEATH OF A WATERLOO VETERAN AT MONTGOMERYSHIRE.

During the last month a most noteworthy person, of the name of John Manuel, died at Llawryglyn, Trefeglwys, in his ninetieth year. He was born in the year 1782, and enlisted at Llanidloes in a militia party from Brecon, in the year 1798, being then in his seventeenth year. On the way to Brecon he was advised to return to his native place, as being, according to his outward appearance, a very unlikely person to do honour to the party which he had enlisted in. However, young John was determined not to return, and followed them to Brecon, at which place a bounty of £30 was offered to him for joining the 79th Highlanders, which he at once accepted, and from which place they (the 79th) had orders to march for Scotland, and thence to Ireland, at the time when the rebellion of 1799 was on its decline. When their services were no more required there, they were ordered to Egypt in the year 1801, to be under the command. of Sir Ralph Abercrombie, whose melancholy death as is so well-known, occurred during this period, when the French were expelled out of Egypt. After this, the regiment was ordered to the scene of the Peninsular war in Spain. Manuel was one of the regiment under the command of Sir John Moore, who retreated to Corunna in 1809, retiring for sixty miles under the fire of the enemy. John Manuel was taken prisoner by the French, and was imprisoned for three years in the citadel of Briankon. At the termination of this period, he was exchanged and restored to his old regiment, the 79th Highlanders. Shortly afterwards, we find the regiment marching for Waterloo, and Manuel fought under Picton against the “bravest of the brave,” Marshal Ney, in the battle of Quartre Bras. Picton fell within thirty yards of the subject of these remarks, and soon afterwards John Manuel had a ball through his head, which passed from ear to ear, part of the left ear being taken off. He fell unconscious, and remained so during the whole of the night and in the morning found himself half covered with water in a ditch. A garden was close by; hunger induced him to help himself to a few gooseberries, which, being unable to bite, he squeezed between his fingers, and let the juice drop into his parched mouth. From this place he. with others who had met with a similar fate, made his way to Brussels, where he obtained medical aid. As soon as he felt himself able, he determined to leave for his home, where he was heartily welcomed as one of the brave men who had nobly fought for their country. He was loved and honoured until the day of his death, and his memory will long remain. His pension was 1s. per day, and he received above £1,000.- Communicated.

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25 October 1872

QUERIES.

WILSON’S PARENTS. — Wilson, the great landscape painter, was born, at Penegoes in the year 1713, of which parish his father was incumbent. Is there sufficient evidence to prove that he sprang from a Trefeghvys family — that his father and grandfather were residents in that parish — and that the Rev. John Wilson was buried in Trefeglwys churchyard? A search among Trefeglwys Parish Registers would settle this point—?

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11 April 1873

REPLIES.

WILSON’S PARENTS (Dec. 11, 1872, Mar. 5, 1873). – A Hugh Wilson was Vicar of Trefeglwys in the year 1677, but he was a persecutor of the Quakers, for in that year he and Isaac Lloyd priest of Llanidloes, gave information of a meeting at the house of John Jarman, at Llanidloes, in Montgomeryshire, upon which the Mayor with constables came hither and committed seven of the assembly to prison, and fined others, who had their cattle seized for their fines.” This appears to have been one of the usual ways of punishing members of the unoffending sect, as other instances are given in the Life of Richard Davies, pp. 87—95. The Wilsons of Trefeglwys occupied a highly respectable position in that parish, and were by marriage connected with some of the leading families in the district. Maurice Lewys, son of Lodovick Lewys, of Pen y-Castell (a descendant through Meredydd Benwyn, of Brochwel Ysgythrog, Prince of Powys) married Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir of Richard Wilson ab John Wilson, and her son, Lodovick Lewis, of Dolgwenith (probably one of the commissioners mentioned, Montgomeryshire Collections ii., 348) was by his wife Mary, daughter of John Pryse, of Park, and sister of Matthew Pryse, M.P. for Montgomeryshire boroughs, father of three co-heirs (1) Mary, the wife of Robert Ingram, of Glynhafren, (2) Elizabeth the wife of Rhys Williams, of Ystym Colwyn, and Trefeglwys, and some of its members were married to Wilsons, thus Morris Bowen (ab Thomas ab Evan) married Jane, daughter of – Wilson, and his brother Evan married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Wilson, of Trefeglwys. – REMAH

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18 April 1873

TREFEGLWYS.

FUNERAL OF MRS EVANS, ARGOED. -The funeral of this lady was solemnized on Saturday morning, April 5th. The deceased hdy was interred in Trefeglwvs Churchyard, and the Rev. Elias Owen, curate of Llanwnog, officiated. Mrs Evans was a sister of the Rev. R. Jones, vicar of the parish.

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19 July 1878

QUERIES.

DYLIFE (May 8, 1878). — This Ecclesiastical District was formed in the year 1856, and comprises parts of the mother parishes of Darowen, Llanbrynmair, Penegoes, and Trefeglwys. Llanbrynmair contributed 1,200 acres, and Trefeglwys 6,500 acres. Will the incumbents of the two other parishes kindly inform the readers of Byegones the acreage taken from their respective livings?

IDLOES.

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